Armis Demos BLEEDINGBIT at Black Hat Europe

By Ben Seri, VP of Research Last month we disclosed BLEEDINGBIT, two critical chip-level vulnerabilities related to the use of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) chips made by Texas Instruments (TI) used in millions of enterprise access points made by Cisco, … Continue Reading

Armis Discovers “BLEEDINGBIT,” Two Critical Chip-Level Vulnerabilities That Expose Millions of Enterprise Access Points to Undetectable Attack

Two critical vulnerabilities related to the use of Texas Instruments Bluetooth Low-Energy chips embedded in Cisco, Meraki and Aruba access points impact business networks PALO ALTO, Calif., Nov. 1, 2018 — Armis, the enterprise IoT security company, today announced the … Continue Reading

BlueBorne: One Year Later, 2 Billion Devices Still Exposed

By Ben Seri, VP of Research One year ago, Armis disclosed the airborne attack vector BlueBorne, a set of nine exploitable Bluetooth vulnerabilities that can give an attacker complete control of a device and its data. It impacted almost every … Continue Reading

Airborne Cyber Threats Reach Amazon Echo and Google Home, Reveals IoT Security Company Armis

20M IoT Devices Putting Enterprises, Homes at Risk PALO ALTO, Calif., NOV. 15, 2017 — Armis, the enterprise IoT security company, today announced that popular, voice-activated personal assistant devices including the Amazon Echo and Google Home were impacted by BlueBorne … Continue Reading

BlueBorne Android Exploit

BlueBorne on Android: Exploiting an RCE Over the Air

This past weekend, Armis researchers Ben Seri and Gregory Vishnepolsky presented a detailed explanation of the Android Remote Code Execution vulnerabilities related to the BlueBorne attack vector at the Hacktivity conference. This presentation included new information regarding the vulnerability, as … Continue Reading

Armis identifies new airborne cyber threat, “BlueBorne,” that exposes almost every device to remote attack

Eight Bluetooth-related vulnerabilities (four that are critical) affecting over 5 billion Android, Windows and Linux devices could allow attackers to take control of devices, access corporate data and networks, and easily spread malware to other devices PALO ALTO, California, Sept. … Continue Reading